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Lymphedema & CVI Information
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Lymphedema is the accumulation of lymphatic fluid in the extremities, as well as other areas of the body. It occurs when the lymphatic flow is interrupted due to trauma, surgery, congenital abnormality, radiation, infection or other causes. When the system is blocked for a long enough period of time, protein-rich fluid accumulates and swelling occurs. Lymphedema is a long-term, chronic condition that cannot be cured but can be effectively managed with the proper treatment and products.

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The Lymphatic System

The lymphatic system is part of the circulatory system and consists primarily of lymph vessels, nodes and tissues. Networks of the lymphatic system are located throughout the body. The lymphatic system removes impurities from the circulatory system and produces cells necessary in fighting various bacteria and viruses that can cause infections such as cellulitis.

Lymph vessels are channels containing colorless fluid called lymph. Lymph is comprised of white blood cells and waste products for lymph tissue. Lymph fluid passes through valves located in the lymph vessels. As fluid passes through these nodes, harmful bacteria and viruses are removed.

Chronic venous problems including venous insufficiency and venous stasis are also treated effectively with compression therapy. Venous insufficiency occurs as a result of faulty or damaged venous valves permitting a backflow of blood, causing pain, swelling, ulcers and pigmentation changes. Venous statsis is the slowing or stoppage of blood flow.

Left untreated, lymphedema and venous problems can lead to other serious problems including infection, fibrosis, pain, skin breakdown, functional disability.

Before Compression Therapy Treatment
After Compression Therapy Treatment


Primary and Secondary Lymphedema

Primary lymphedema may be congenital in nature or present at birth. It is more common during the second and third decades of life and is called lymphedema praecox.

Milroy's disease is a chronic hereditary condition and presents at or near birth. In some cases it develops after the age of 35 and is called lymphedema tarda.

Secondary lymphedema is the result of damage to the lymphatic system for a variety of reasons including surgery, trauma, radiation and infection.

Surgical procedures interrupting normal lymphatic function such as surgery for cancer in the breast or groin areas may prevent lymph fluid flowing naturally through its system.

A traumatic injury may affect the lymphatic system, damaging the normal flow of lymphatic fluid.

Radiation therapy can damage an otherwise healthy lymphatic system by causing scar tissue to form, subsequently interrupting the normal flow of lymphatic fluid.

In addition, repeated episodes of infection can cause progressive closure of the lymphatic system, thus worsening the condition.



Congenital Lymphedema

Before treatment...
After five days of compression therapy treatment:


Chronic Venous Insufficiency

Chronic venous problems including venous insufficiency and venous stasis are also treated effectively with compression therapy. Venous insufficiency occurs as a result of faulty or damaged venous valves permitting a backflow of blood, causing pain, swelling, ulcers and pigmentation changes. Venous stasis is the slowing or stoppage of blood flow.

Left untreated, lymphedema and venous problems can lead to other serious problems including infection, fibrosis, pain, skin breakdown, functional disability.

Venous stasis ulcerations are normally located on the inside of the ankle area. The wound can start out small and continue to increase in size if left untreated. Removing the edema will allow for oxygen and other nutrients to reach the damaged tissue and enable the wound to begin healing.

Compression therapy has been clinically proven to treat chronic venous insufficiency and edema and heal venous stasis ulcerations by promoting venous blood flow and enhancing systemic fibrinolytic activity.

Before
After

DISCLAIMER - This site is designed for educational and promotional purposes only and is not engaged in rendering medical advice or professional services. The information provided here should not be used for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease. It is not a substitute for professional care. If you have, or suspect you may have, a health problem, you should consult your physician. This information is provided in good faith, but no warranty can be made for its accuracy. The opinions expressed herein are exclusively ours. If you have any questions, please contact us.

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